Skip to content

The Aesthetic Surgery Education and Research Foundation

Published
CD30+ T Cells in Late Seroma May Not Be Diagnostic of Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Print

Marshall E. Kadin, MD; John Morgan, PhD; Haiying Xu, BS; and  Caroline A. Glicksman, MD

Aesthetic Surgery Journal  2017, Vol 37(7) 771–775

>> View on the Aesthetic Surgery Journal  Website

 
Adipose Stem Cell Function Maintained with Age: An Intra-Subject Study of Long-Term Cryopreserved Cells Print

Lauren E. Kokai, PhD; Dmitry O. Traktuev, PhD; Liyong Zhang, PhD;  Stephanie Merfeld-Clauss, BS; Gabriella DiBernardo, BS;  Hongyan Lu, PhD; Kacey G. Marra, PhD; Albert Donnenberg, PhD;  Vera Donnenberg, PhD; E. Michael Meyer, BS; Peter B. Fodor, MD;  Keith L. March, MD, PhD; and J. Peter Rubin, MD

Aesthetic Surgery Journal  2017, Vol 37(4) 454–463

Background:The progressive decline in tissue mechanical strength that occurs with aging is hypothesized to be due to a loss of resident stem cell number and function. As such, there is concern regarding use of autologous adult stem cell therapy in older patients. To abrogate this, many patients elect to cryopreserve the adipose stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) of lipoaspirate, which contains resident adipose stem cells (ASC). However, it is not clear yet if there is any clinical benefit from banking cells at a younger age.

 >> View on the Aesthetic Surgery Journal  Website

 
Biomarkers Provide Clues to Early Events in the Pathogenesis of Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Print


Marshall E. Kadin, MD; Anand Deva, MD; Haiying Xu, BS;John Morgan, PhD; Pranay Khare, PhD; Roderick A.F. MacLeod, PhD;Bruce W. Van Natta, MD; William P. Adams Jr., MD; Garry S. Brody, MD;and Alan L. Epstein, MD, PhD

Aesthetic Surgery Journal  2016, Vol 36(7) 773–781

Abstract: Almost 200 women worldwide have been diagnosed with breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL). The unique location and specific lymphoma type strongly suggest an etio-pathologic link between breast implants and BIA-ALCL. It is postulated that chronic inflammation via bacterial infection may be an etiological factor. BIA-ALCL resembles primary cutaneous ALCL (pcALCL) in morphology, activated T-cell phenotype, and indolent clinical course. Gene expression array analysis,flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to study pcALCL and BIA-ALCL cell lines. Clinical samples were also studied to characterize transcription factor and cytokine profiles of tumor cells and surrounding lymphocytes. BIA-ALCL and pcALCL were found to have common expression of transcription factors SOCS3, JunB, SATB1, and a cytokine profile suggestive of a Th1 phenotype. Similar patterns were observed in a CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). The patterns of cytokine and transcription factor expression suggest that BIA-ALCL is likely to arise from chronic bacterial antigen stimulation of T-cells. Further analysis of cytokine and transcription factor profiles may allow early detection and treatment of BIA-ALCL leading to better prognosis and survival.

>> View on the Aesthetic Surgery Journal  Website

 
<< Start < Prev 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Next > End >>

Page 13 of 17

"I GIVE..."

Dr. and Mrs. James R. Payne
Modesto, CA
Life Insurance Policy

“…because there are so many important areas of plastic surgery research that need further or ongoing support to help improve our specialty.”

The Aesthetic Society


Copyright © 2009-2018 ASERF. 11262 Monarch St., Garden Grove, CA 92841-1441 P: 800-364-2147 F: 562-799-1098