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Body Contouring Following Bariatric Surgery: Effects on Obesity-Related Functional and Psychosocial Impairment Print

The ASERF Scientific Research Committee and Board of Directors are pleased to announce the following grant award:

Researcher: Valentina Ivejaz, MD

Grant Award: ASERF Interim Grant

Amount Awarded: $13,046

Project Name: Body Contouring Following Bariatric Surgery: Effects on Obesity-Related Functional and Psychosocial Impairment

Project Summary: Bariatric surgery, or weight loss surgery (WLS), is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity, often resulting in massive weight loss and improved medical and psychosocial functioning. Burgeoning research suggests that the majority of WLS patients desire body contouring surgery (BCS) to remove loose skin following WLS. Many patients, however, are unable to obtain BCS due to financial and insurance barriers. There is a dearth of literature prospectively examining WLS and BCS outcomes. Specifically, little is known about changes that occur pre- and post-BCS among WLS patients and whether BCS helps improve obesity-related and psychosocial functioning in this patient group, who often exhibit greater medical and psychological comorbidities relative to the general population.

Thus, the purpose of the present study is two-fold: 1) to prospectively examine obesity-related (e.g., weight, disability) and psychosocial (e.g., mood, body image) outcomes in individuals who undergo body contouring surgery (BCS) following WLS, and 2) to compare WLS patients who obtain BCS (BCS group) versus those who seek, but do not obtain, BCS (WLS group). Such studies may help determine which patients derive the most benefit from BCS following bariatric surgery.

PRIMARY AIMS and HYPOTHESES:

Aim #1: To examine the outcomes of BCS on obesity-related and psychosocial functioning among weight loss surgery patients at 1 month and 3 months following BCS.

Hypothesis #1: Individuals undergoing BCS following weight loss surgery will report significant improvements in obesity-related and psychosocial functioning following BCS.

Aim #2: To test for group differences in outcomes between the WLS and BCS groups.

Hypothesis #2: The BCS group will report significantly greater improvements in obesity-related and psychosocial functioning than the WLS group.

SECONDARY AIM AND HYPOTHESIS

Aim #3: To explore baseline characteristics as predictors of outcome.

Hypothesis #3: In this exploratory analysis, demographic variables (sex, age, and ethnicity/race) and clinical variables (body image dissatisfaction, body mass index, depression levels) will be tested as predictors of change in the primary body contouring surgery outcomes.

 
The Effect of Amniotic Membrane and Fat Grafts on Capsular Contracture Print

The ASERF Scientific Research Committee and Board of Directors are pleased to announce the following grant award:

Researcher: Hooman Soltanian

Grant Award: ASERF Interim Grant

Amount Awarded: $24,000

Project Name: The Effect of Amniotic Membrane and Fat Grafts on Capsular Contracture 

Project Summary: Capsular contracture is a common problem in both breast augmentation and implant-based breast reconstruction cases, which are among the most frequently performed plastic surgery procedures today. Capsular contracture can lead to cosmetic deformity, pain, emotional hardship and can result in additional, unplanned procedures and post-operative recovery time. In spite of the prevalence and morbidity of this problem, few studies have offered solutions for altering the underlying pathophysiology (1), and there are currently no clinical means for managing this problem other than performing revisionary surgical procedures.

Two tissues that have shown interesting properties in surgical fields are human amniotic membrane (HAM) and autologous fat. HAM has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-scarring and antimicrobial effects (2). Similarly, fat grafting has been used to treat the sequelae of radiation-induced skin changes, a phenomenon which has been explained by the effect of Adipose Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs) on fibrotic tissues (3,4). Given the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties of these tissues, we believe that HAM and autologous fat grafts could be used to prevent and/or treat capsular contracture. The current study will examine the effect of HAM and fat grafts on radiation induced fibrosis; a first step in possible human application.

 
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